88 Money-Making Writing Jobs

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THE BEST WAYS TO MAKE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS WRITING!

blogging for money

blogging for money

Writers today are no longer just working on books and newspapers. Businesses, advertisers, and hundreds of other outlets are desperate for people who can craft effective messages and persuade people with their words. A strong writer can make $50 to $200 per hour, or even more… if you know where to find the work.

Robert Bly is a professional writer who makes more than $600,000 per year from his writing. Now, he’s ready to share his secrets. 88 Money-Making Writing Jobs presents the best outlets writers can find to turn their words into profit (including many that few people think to seek out).

  • Along with an overview of each job, you’ll discover:
  • A breakdown of what it typically pays
  • The nuts and bolts of what you’ll write
  • What it takes to work in the field
  • How to get started
  • Resources for finding the work

For anyone serious about a career as a writer, this guide offers the best information on how to make incredible money in ways that are fun, challenging, and make the most of your writing talents.

Getting Started
1. Write. Jot down your ideas. One great aspect of greeting card writing is that it can be done anywhere. If you have five minutes, grab a pen and brainstorm.

2. Request guidelines. There are dozens of greeting card publishers in the United States, some of which you can find online at www.writerswrite.com/greeting cards/publish.htm. Contact the publisher, president, or creative director. Many companies have their submission guidelines available online. If not, send the company a polite request for their guidelines, along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Focus on midsize companies. Large companies do not accept unsolicited materials.

3. Research. Publishers tend to produce similar cards; browse their cards on their websites if not at the store. Get an idea of what they’re selling and make sure your cards match. Like any other industry, greeting cards follow trends. Know what those trends focus on before submitting any work.

4. Type your work. No matter what format the company requires, always type your work. Include your name and address on the top left-hand corner of all your submissions.

5. Send your submission. Make sure everything you send includes your personal contact information and a #10 self-addressed, stamped envelope. The easier it is for a company to contact you, the more likely the sell. Send six to twenty submissions at one time, and resist sending simultaneous submissions to other companies. Once you have submitted your work, sit back and wait. It could take several weeks or months for a publisher to send a reply.

If you are serious about greeting card writing, there are a few resources listed below to consider. Good luck, and happy birthday, or Merry Christmas, or whatever.


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